Hymn Based Resources

John D. Horman & Mary Nelson Keithahn.

Hymns Etc.

"Music is the art of the prophets, the only art that can calm the agitations of the soul; it is one of the most magnificient and delightful presents God has given us."

Martin Luther

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HYMNS ETC. - Hymns for the Lecitonary

Hymns for the Lectionary September 2017 - January 2018

September 24 (Twenty-Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 20).  In the United Church of Christ this is also celebrated as American Indian Sunday.  An appropriate hymn, using Lakota imagery, is “Like Ancient People on a Quest” (MITAKUYE OYASIN) from our collection, The Song Lingers On (Zimbel Press).

October 15 (Twenty-eight Sunday in Ordinary Time, Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 23).  On this Children’s Sabbath, consider using “Before the Dawn Had Broken” (CHILD-LIKE FAITH), from our new collection, Faith That Lets Us Sing (Wayne Leupold Ediitons, Inc.)  The hymn mentions four children in the Bible who trusted in God’s Love (Samuel, David, Namaan’s maid, and the boy who shared his lunch) and suggests that blessings will come to us when we too trust the power of that love.

October 29 (Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Twenty-first Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 25).  Our hymn, “They Built the Church” (CHANGING TIMES), another hymn from Faith That Lets Us Sing, supports the Gospel reading, Matthew 22:34-36.

November 19 (Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost-Proper 28).  Our hymn, “Like a Thief in the Night” (THIEF IN THE NIGHT) supports the Epistle (I Thessalonians 5:1-11) for this day.  It is in our collection, Faith That Lets Us Sing. 

November 23 (Thanksgiving Day) or earlier in the week.  Thanksgiving is a national holiday in the U.S., celebrated by persons of all faiths. If your church participates in a community inter-faith Thanksgiving service, consider using our altered version of “Now Thank We All Our God” (NUN DANKET) from Faith That Lets Us Sing.  Two new stanzas replace the original third Trinitarian doxological stanza, making it appropriate for inter-faith worship. 

November 26 (Reign of Christ, Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 29). The Gospel reading, Matthew 25:31-46 is especially relevant in these times.  We suggest these hymns:  “Hope, for a Child” (DRAKE) from Faith That Lets Us Sing, and “When Jesus Was a Refugee” (NEIGHBORS) from The Song Lingers On.

December 24 (Fourth Sunday of Advent).  The first stanza of “When Mary Heard An Angel Say” (EVONNE) wonders that Mary believed the angel who told her she would bear God’s promised one.  Succeeding stanzas wonder too that Joseph heeded the angel’s assurance that he should marry and care for Mary, and that shepherds believed the angels who sang the good news of Jesus’ birth to them. The hymn ends with a prayer that we too might see and listen God’s angelic presence in our lives.  The hymn is in our collection, Faith That Lets Us Sing, which has a number of new Christmas hymns and songs, including “Come, Dayspring from on High (DAYSPRING), a short worship song with a refrain, “Maranatha, Our Lord, Come,” suitable for a congregational or choral invocation.  Another of our hymns, “One Holy Night in Bethlehem” (WHISTLER’S TUNE) in the supplements, The Faith We Sing/Sing the Faith (Abingdon Press/Geneva Press)is also a nice choice for Christmas Eve.

December 31 (New Year’s Eve).  “Spirit Child Jesus” (Spirit-Child) in the supplement, Worship and Song (Abingdon Press), is appropriate for this day, or Epiphany Sunday.

January 6 (Epiphany).  One of my favorite hymns in our Faith That Lets Us Sing is “Though Shepherds Heard the Angels” (BAINTON) which is about what Mary might have thought about the strange gifts the wise men brought her child.  The text was inspired by memories of Roland Bainton reading from Martin Luther’s Christmas sermons every year at Yale Divinity School. 

Let us come into God's presence with thanksgiving; let us make a joyful noise to God with songs of praise!

Psalm 95:2

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